Filter in Python

If you are looking for the right resource to learn about the basics and application of Filter in Python, you have landed the right place. Learn how.

Parameter function
iterable

Details

callable that determines the condition or None then use the identity function for filtering (positional-only)

iterable that will be filtered (positional-only)

Basic use of Filter in Python

To filter discards elements of a sequence based on some criteria:

names = ['Fred', 'Wilma', 'Barney']
def long_name(name):
return len(name) > 5

Python 2.x Version ≥ 2.0

filter(long_name, names)

Out: [‘Barney’]
[name for name in names if len(name) > 5] # equivalent list comprehension # Out: ['Barney']
from itertools import ifilter
ifilter(long_name, names) # as generator (similar to python 3.x filter builtin)
Out:
list(ifilter(long_name, names)) # equivalent to filter with lists
Out: [‘Barney’]
(name for name in names if len(name) > 5) # equivalent generator expression
Out: at 0x0000000003FD5D38>

Python 2.x Version ≥ 2.6

Besides the options for older python 2.x versions there is a future_builtin function: from future_builtins import filter
filter(long_name, names)# identical to itertools.ifilter
Out:

Python 3.x Version ≥ 3.0

filter(long_name, names) # returns a generator
Out:
list(filter(long_name, names)) # cast to list
Out: [‘Barney’]
(name for name in names if len(name) > 5) # equivalent generator expression # Out: at 0x000001C6F49BF4C0>

Filter without function

If the function parameter is None, then the identity function will be used:

list(filter(None, [1, 0, 2, [], '', 'a'])) # discards 0, [] and ''
Out: [1, 2, 'a']
Python 2.x Version ≥ 2.0.1
[i for i in [1, 0, 2, [], '', 'a'] if i] # equivalent list comprehension

Python 3.x Version ≥ 3.0.0

(i for i in [1, 0, 2, [], '', 'a'] if i) # equivalent generator expression

Filter in Python as short-circuit check

filter (python 3.x) and ifilter (python 2.x) return a generator so they can be very handy when creating a short-circuit test like or or and:

Python 2.x Version ≥ 2.0.1

not recommended in real use but keeps the example short: from itertools import ifilter as filter

Python 2.x Version ≥ 2.6.1

from future_builtins import filter

To find the first element that is smaller than 100:

car_shop = [('Toyota', 1000), ('rectangular tire', 80), ('Porsche', 5000)] def find_something_smaller_than(name_value_tuple):
print('Check {0}, {1}$'.format(*name_value_tuple)
return name_value_tuple[1] < 100
next(filter(find_something_smaller_than, car_shop))
Print: Check Toyota, 1000$
Check rectangular tire, 80$
Out: ('rectangular tire', 80)

The next-function gives the next (in this case first) element of and is therefore the reason why it’s short-circuit.

Filter in Python: Complementary function: filterfalse, ifilterfalse

There is a complementary function for filter in the itertools-module:

Python 2.x Version ≥ 2.0.1

not recommended in real use but keeps the example valid for python 2.x and python 3.x from itertools import ifilterfalse as filterfalse

Python 3.x Version ≥ 3.0.0

from itertools import filterfalse

which works exactly like the generator filter but keeps only the elements that are False:

Usage without function (None):
list(filterfalse(None, [1, 0, 2, [], '', 'a'])) # discards 1, 2, 'a'
Out: [0, [], '']
Usage with function
names = ['Fred', 'Wilma', 'Barney']
def long_name(name):
return len(name) > 5
list(filterfalse(long_name, names))
Out: ['Fred', 'Wilma']
Short-circuit usage with next:
car_shop = [('Toyota', 1000), ('rectangular tire', 80), ('Porsche', 5000)] def find_something_smaller_than(name_value_tuple):
print('Check {0}, {1}$'.format(*name_value_tuple)
return name_value_tuple[1] < 100
next(filterfalse(find_something_smaller_than, car_shop))
Print: Check Toyota, 1000$
Out: ('Toyota', 1000)
Using an equivalent generator:
car_shop = [('Toyota', 1000), ('rectangular tire', 80), ('Porsche', 5000)] generator = (car for car in car_shop if not car[1] < 100) next(generator)

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